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20176

When Professor Everett Land is found dead, detective Brandy Mather has a puzzle on her hands. The body is definitely his; dental records confirm his identity. But Professor Land is in his forties and the body is that of a very old man. What could have caused him to age so rapidly? Why is the corpse smiling? Brandy enlists the aid of computer scientist Dan Martin, who is smart, handsome, and anxious to help. Dan is almost too good to be true, and Brandy soon falls in love. But something is off about Dan. . . very off. Brandy's investigation soon throws her into the midst of small-town politics, bank robberies, and vampires.

20170

With this stunning and original debut, Ian Irvine begins the saga of The View from the Mirror, a brilliant epic fantasy that rivals the works of Robert Jordan and J. V. Jones. "Once there were three worlds, each with its own human race. Then, fleeing from out of the void came a fourth race, the Charon. Desperate, on the edge of extinction, they changed the balance between the worlds forever..." The Tale of the Forbidding In ancient times the Way Between the Worlds was shattered, leaving bands of Aachim, Faellem, and Charon trapped with the old humans of Santhenar. Now Llian, a Chronicler of the Great Tales, uncovers a 3,000-year-old secret too deadly to be revealed-while Karan, a young sensitive, is compelled by honor to undertake a perilous mission. Neither can imagine they will soon meet as hunted fugitives, snared in the machinations of immortals, the vengeance of warlords, and the magics of powerful mancers. For the swelling deluge of a millennial war is rising, terrible as a tsunami, ready to cast torrents of sorcery and devastation across the land...

20166

Nastasya has lived for hundreds of years, but for some reason it never seems to get any easier. She's left behind her days of debauchery to find peace and forgiveness at River's Edge, a safe haven for wayward immortals. There she's uncovered her family's epic history, reclaimed her magickal powers, and met Reyn, whom she dubs "the Viking god. " Just as she settles into her new life, Nastasya learns that her old friends might be in town.... Reuniting with her gorgeous and dangerous ex-best-friend, Innocencio, Nas wonders if she'll ever be truly free of her dark legacy. Is Incy dangerous, power-hungry, and wicked? Or is he the only one who truly understands Nas's darkness? Either way, Nas is desperate to find out who she really is-even if the answer kills her.

20161

Eighteen years ago, Jake Lassiter crossed paths with a teenage runaway who disappeared into South Florida’s sex trade. Now he retraces her steps and runs head-on into a conspiracy of Miami’s rich and powerful who would do anything to keep the past as dark as night and silent as the grave. In this tale of redemption and revenge, Edgar-nominated author Paul Levine delivers his most powerful thriller yet. Jake Lassiter, second-string linebacker turned low-rent lawyer, is cynical about the law, but if you hire him, he’ll take a punch for you . . . and maybe a swing at the prosecutor, too. Amy Larkin—beautiful, angry, and mysterious—accuses Lassiter of involvement in the disappearance of her sister eighteen years earlier. What does Lassiter know about Krista Larkin, the runaway teen turned porn actress? More than he’s saying. Seeking to atone for his own past, Lassiter follows the cold trail of the missing Krista and butts head with the powerful men who also knew her: a former porn king turned philanthropist, a slick Cuban-born prosecutor who’d love to be governor, and an aging mobster who once worked for the infamous Meyer Lansky.  The evidence leads to a long-ago night of kinky sex, designer drugs—and possible murder. But before Lassiter can nail the truth, a gun goes off, a suspect falls dead, and Amy is charged with murder. The state has an eyewitness and a slam-dunk case. Lassiter has a client he doesn’t trust and a case he can’t win. Did Amy shoot the man who killed her sister? Or the wrong man? And what really happened to Krista? The answers, buried under years of deceit and corruption, are revealed in an explosive courtroom finale proving that rough justice is better than no justice at all. From the Hardcover edition. Review Advance praise for *Lassiter* “Jake Lassiter, the toughest lawyer in Miami, is back, fighting for justice and his fees, not always in that order. Paul Levine’s Lassiter is the courtroom drama of the year."—Harlan Coben “Paul Levine is one of South Florida’s great writers, and Lassiter is his greatest creation. It’s funny, smart, and compelling.”—Dave Barry “Jake Lassiter is the lawyer we all want on our side—and on the page.”—Lee Child “Paul Levine possesses one of the strongest voices in crime fiction, and his Jake Lassiter is one of my favorite characters of all time. Why? He makes me laugh, even as he fights for justice. Lassiter is a brew-and-burger guy, with the biggest heart in the bar association and a conscience to match. If you haven’t met Jake Lassiter, start right now, with Lassiter.”—Lisa Scottoline “Paul Levine’s Jake Lassiter is in a class of his own. No crossbred comparisons with other protagonists suffice to describe this larger-than-life character with his raw intelligence, street smarts, and a self-deprecating wit that makes you just love the guy. Lassiter combines edgy storytelling, tight plotting and Levine’s trademark crackling dry humor—I really couldn’t put the book down. It’s a terrific, fast-paced read from beginning to end.”—Jacqueline Winspear “Jake Lassiter was never really gone—he’s already earned his place alongside Travis McGee in Florida crime fiction—but that won’t stop me from celebrating the fact that Paul Levine has brought him back in big way. Yes, Jake feels like an old friend, but Lassiter is no walk down memory lane. It’s sharp, sexy, and full of surprises—a rare opportunity to enjoy a gifted writer at the top o... About the Author Paul Levine is a former trial lawyer and the award-winning author of legal thrillers including Illegal, Solomon vs. Lord (nominated for the Macavity Award and the James Thurber Prize), The Deep Blue Alibi (nominated for an Edgar Award), and Kill All the Lawyers (a finalist for the International Thriller Writers Award). He won the John D. MacDonald Award for his critically acclaimed Jake Lassiter novels, which are now available as ebooks. He’s also written more than twenty episodes for the CBS military drama JAG. Paul Levine lives in Los Angeles, where he is working on his next Jake Lassiter thriller.

20159

TOP HARDBOILED MYSTERY BESTSELLER "I was sitting at the end of the bar sipping single-malt Scotch when I spotted the tall blond woman with the large green eyes and the small gray gun." The next thing Jake Lassiter knows, the woman pumps three bullets into the man on the next barstool. Lassiter, the linebacker-turned-lawyer, has a new client. She's stunning model Chrissy Bernhardt, and the dead man is her wealthy father. The defense? Chrissy claims that she's recently recovered repressed memories of having been sexually abused by her father. Jake wants to believe her but suspects that the memories were either implanted by a shady psychiatrist or fabricated by Chrissy herself. Complicating the situation, Jake falls for his client, clouding his judgment. Is she an anguished victim or a cold-blooded killer? And what about her brother, who stands to inherit a fortune if Chrissy goes to prison? Jake wades into a quagmire of dirty water deals, big money, and family corruption, all leading to an explosive finale. From Booklist Pro football player turned lawyer Jake Lassiter is savoring a drink at a South Beach bar when a beautiful young woman shoots the man on the next bar stool and faints in Lassiter's arms. It's one way to get clients, he figures. The woman, Chrissy Bernhardt, is charged with the first-degree murder of her father, whom Chrissy believes abused her as a child. Lassiter takes the case, which is complicated by the fact that Chrissy's repressed memories of her father's abuse have been "unlocked" with the help of a therapist who turns out to be her late mother's former lover. The seventh Lassiter novel continues the series' steady improvement. Lassiter is smart, tough, funny, and very human. He's coming on fast as one of the most entertaining series characters in contemporary crime fiction. Wes Lukowsky From Kirkus Reviews Not even a lawyer as light on his feet as Jake Lassiter can find much wiggle room when he himself was one of the dozens of witnesses who watched his client, model Chrissy Bernhardt, walk up to her father in a crowded bar and shoot him three times, sending him spiraling into a fatal heart attack. And things just get worse when Chrissy's psychiatrist, obliging Dr. Lawrence Schein, hands Jake solid-gold evidence of Chrissy's childhood abuse by Harry Bernhardt--something Schein claims is a perfect defense, though it's nothing more or less, to Jake's disillusioned eyes, than the perfect motive for premeditated murder. With no hope of winning acquittal for a client who tells him she wanted to hurt the old man as badly as he'd hurt her and who cheerfully disclaims the slightest sign of remorse, Jake's only prayer is to go for manslaughter. But armed with all those tapes of Dr. Schein's (including the prizewinner, in which Chrissy tells him she's just bought the gun she's going to shoot her father with), who could doubt the premeditation the prosecution alleges--unless of course it's Jake himself, who's broken his usual rule against sleeping with his clients in favor of the deeper rule that draws him to every guilty-looking dame in Miami? Jake just never learns about women--luckily for his fans, who'll find this impossible case, his seventh (Fool Me Twice, 1995, etc.), more tightly wound than any since his debut in To Speak for the Dead (1990). -- Copyright ©1996, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

20158

Helping thief Blinky Baroso escape a fraud charge, NFL linebacker-turned-attorney Jake Lassiter finds himself cheated by his would-be client and framed with a murder rap, a situation that brings him to the Continental Divide. Reprint. K. From Publishers Weekly Linebacker-turned-lawyer Jake Lassiter is back (after Slashback) in a case that threatens to end his career, if not his life. Successfully defending con man Louis "Blinky" Baroso against fraud charges earns the Miami attorney 100 shares of Rocky Mountain Treasures Inc., a buried-treasure salvage company in Colorado. After his acquittal, Blinky disappears, having neglected to mention that he listed Lassiter as the company's secretary/treasurer and general counsel. Then the strangled body of one of Blinky's associates is found hanging from the lawyer's ceiling fan. A further tangle comes in the shape of Blinky's sister, Jo Jo, who is Lassiter's former lover and the current belle of Kit Carson Cimarron, who owns 70% of Rocky Mountain Treasures. When Jo Jo flees Miami for Aspen, Lassiter follows, hoping to find Blinky, clear himself of murder charges and perhaps rekindle romance with Jo Jo. A fight with Cimarron, involving a horsewhip and a nail gun, lands Lassiter in the hospital, where he's forced to question who are his enemies and friends. Although the narrating Lassiter's humor sometimes slips from cynical wit into campy vaudeville asides, Levine keeps pages turning as he blends legal elements into this mystery. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. From Library Journal Ex-mediocre Miami Dolphin linebacker and now small-time defense lawyer Jake Lassiter is accused of murder when a body turns up in his Miami house. Following his former lover Jo Jo, whose con-man brother (Jake's friend and often client) has disappeared, Lassiter journeys to Aspen, Colorado, and the abandoned silver mines beneath it. Soon, he ends up on trial for a different murder, with Jo Jo as the star prosecution witness. Jake seeks help from his Florida friends: his Granny, who is right out of Dogpatch; a Latin-quoting retired coroner; and a black preacher-turned-lawyer. In the end, however, it's his movie-quoting, 11-year-old, just-discovered nephew who helps the most in this fast-paced, often humorous tale of treachery and greed. Lawyer Levine displays his courtroom knowledge and his facility with noir elements in this sixth in a series (Mortal Sin, LJ 1/94). Fool Me Twice should create new fans.?Roland Person, Southern Illinois Univ. Lib., Carbondale Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

20156

Representing a client who has admitted his guilt in the killing of a fellow warehouse worker, Miami trial lawyer Jake Lassiter is suspicious and is determined to get at the truth. Reprint. NYT. From Publishers Weekly Levine's third novel starring lawyer and ex-Miami Dolphin Jake Lassiter (after To Speak for the Dead ) mixes an international conspiracy stew out of a huge list of ingredients that includes Cuban socialists, Cuban exiles, Japanese art smugglers, double-dealing CIA agents and even a beautiful operative from the Finnish Intelligence Agency. Lassiter, working at the Miami firm of Harman and Fox, is asked to defend his old friend Francisco Crespo, who cheerfully admits that he murdered a Russian co-worker by skewering him on a forklift. But medical evidence indicates that Crespo was unconscious at the time of the Russian's death. Why is he lying? Things become a little clearer when Lassiter receives a veiled warning from Matsuo Yagamata, Crespo's employer and a big Harman and Fox client, and a lot clearer when Yagamata displays the contents of a Faberge egg he has no business owning. By then it's pretty obvious what's going on, so the real question becomes: who's on what side? The answer changes literally chapter by chapter, with double-, triple- and quadruple-crosses piling up to the point of self-parody. The silliness is redeemed only by the character of Levine's hero and narrator. Lassiter is like the sole halfback in a field full of quarterbacks: he just takes the ball and runs, and whoever hands him the ball points him in another direction. A quirky little mystery with enough twists and turns to satisfy Robert Ludlum fans and a unique hero who will always be more of a ball-carrier than a playmaker. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. From Kirkus Reviews Beefcake Miami lawyer Jake Lassiter (To Speak for the Dead, Night Vision) is determined to save Francisco Crespo, his old landlady's son, from a murder charge Francisco wants to plead guilty to--little realizing he's buying into a fantastically twisted plot to steal billions worth of Russian-owned art. It isn't long before Jake starts to suspect the man who's paying his bill--Francisco's wealthy employer, import king Matsuo Yagamata-- of involvement in the murder of Soviet ‚migr‚ Vladimir Smorodinsky. Ignoring the mitigating depositions of two witnesses his go-getting new investigator, Lourdes Soto, has dug up, he concentrates instead on a few suspiciously pricey artworks--the Faberg‚ egg Yagamata has been proudly displaying, a Matisse canvas Lourdes's rabid anti-Castro father Severo has hanging on his wall--that are supposed to be in the Hermitage. But just as Francisco is about to come clean with Jake about what appears to be a grandly scaled robbery, he's killed by someone who leaves Jake holding the door for the local police and treacherous, protean CIA agent Robert T. Foley. Foley's entrance pushes Levine way over the top. Telling Jake first that the CIA has been trying to round up the artworks to return them to Russia, then that the US helped party regulars steal them in order to set them up for Gorbachev to oust, he tries to frame Jake for Francisco's murder, then blackmail him into conspiring with the CIA to return the paintings, then trick him into releasing them to Foley as a free-lance thief, and finally negotiate a finder's fee as Foley's lawyer so that Yeltsin's Russia can pay to recover them. He doesn't realize--and neither does Jake, who's two steps behind everybody this time--that the Soto family have plenty of surprises up their own sleeves. Entertainingly audacious, though eventually the incessant double- crossing gets tiring. Jake's law degree turns out to be a lot less useful than his demi-season with the Dolphins. -- Copyright ©1993, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

20154

Lieutenant Lou Boldt, the Seattle cop who stars in Ridley Pearson'sdeservedly popular series, is a sharp and touching figure--perhaps the most believable police officer in current fiction. Early in this ninth book about his public and private life, Lou has to put on a bullet-resistant vest to lead a raid against some dangerous criminals. "The vest was notphysically heavy, but its presence was," Pearson tells us.It meant battle; it meant risk. For Boldt a vest was a symbol of youth. It had been well over a year since he had worn one. Ironically, as he approached the hangar's north door at a light run behind his own four heavily armored ERT personnel, he caught himself worrying about his hands, not his life. He didn't want to smash up his piano hands in some close quarters skirmish...Boldt plays jazz piano one night a week in a local bar, and despite his concern for his hands, he takes every opportunity he can to get away from his desk and into the streets. But money pressures, caused by his wife's recent illness, also make him think about the possibility of a better-paying job in the private sector. Meanwhile, some extremely ruthless people are murdering illegal Chinese immigrant women and leaving their bodiesburied in newly dug graves. An ambitious local TV journalist named Stevie McNeal and the young Chinese woman she thinks of as her "Little Sister" risk their lives to investigate the killings, while Boldt and his team round up a most unusual array of suspects. This combination of hard-edged realism and softer sentiment has become Pearson's trademark, and once again it works smoothly.--Dick Adler Amazon.com Review Lieutenant Lou Boldt, the Seattle cop who stars in Ridley Pearson's deservedly popular series, is a sharp and touching figure--perhaps the most believable police officer in current fiction. Early in this ninth book about his public and private life, Lou has to put on a bullet-resistant vest to lead a raid against some dangerous criminals. "The vest was not physically heavy, but its presence was," Pearson tells us. It meant battle; it meant risk. For Boldt a vest was a symbol of youth. It had been well over a year since he had worn one. Ironically, as he approached the hangar's north door at a light run behind his own four heavily armored ERT personnel, he caught himself worrying about his hands, not his life. He didn't want to smash up his piano hands in some close quarters skirmish... Boldt plays jazz piano one night a week in a local bar, and despite his concern for his hands, he takes every opportunity he can to get away from his desk and into the streets. But money pressures, caused by his wife's recent illness, also make him think about the possibility of a better-paying job in the private sector. Meanwhile, some extremely ruthless people are murdering illegal Chinese immigrant women and leaving their bodies buried in newly dug graves. An ambitious local TV journalist named Stevie McNeal and the young Chinese woman she thinks of as her "Little Sister" risk their lives to investigate the killings, while Boldt and his team round up a most unusual array of suspects. This combination of hard-edged realism and softer sentiment has become Pearson's trademark, and once again it works smoothly. --Dick Adler From Publishers Weekly Impeccably paced, beautifully observed and moving with a crescendo of suspense, this is another thoughtful and exciting Seattle-based police thriller from Pearson (The Pied Piper), whose skill at maintaining a balance between the narrative thrust of his plot and the personal lives of his characters makes him a top-notch practitioner of the genre. We learn just enough about Lt. Lou Boldt's current situation to realize that his recent promotion has had mixed benefits: he misses street work and bends the rules to get out from behind his desk. We also discover that his wife Liz's apparent remission from cancer has created some domestic tensionAshe credits her good results to faith; he can't quite make the same leapAand that financial pressure caused by the loss of her income has made him think about leaving the police force. We acquire this information gradually, as naturally as we would in real life, while being swept along through a heartbreaking narrative that involves illegal Chinese immigrant women being smuggled into Seattle in cargo containers. The story becomes a crusade for two sharp and ambitious female journalistsAlocal TV superstar Stevie McNeal and Melissa Chow, the young Chinese woman McNeal's father adopted, and whom Stevie calls "Little Sister." Lieutenant Boldt and his unusually well-defined team become involved when Melissa goes underground as an illegal and then disappears. Bodies of several Chinese women are found in a public graveyard, the "first victims" of a particularly vicious gang of smugglers. As one of Boldt's colleagues explains to McNeal, "The first victim is generally the one that is handled carelessly." Like all of Pearson's insights into the minds of criminals, cops and citizens, this one is strong, subtle and full of resonance. Atmospheric descriptions of Seattle and some fascinating forensic evidence add texture to a riveting story. $250,000 ad/promo. (July) FYI: The mass market edition of The Pied Piper, released simultaneously, will carry a teaser chapter from The First Victim. Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

20149

In the irresistible second Chet and Bernie mystery, Chet gets a glimpse of the show dog world turned deadly.What first seems like a walk in the park to wise and lovable canine narrator Chet and his human companion Bernie—to investigate threats made against a pretty, pampered show dog—turns into a serious case when Princess and her owner are abducted. To make matters worse, Bernie’s on-again, off-again girlfriend, reporter Susie Sanchez, disappears too. When Chet is separated from Bernie, he’s on his own to put the pieces together, find his way home, and save the day. Spencer Quinn’s "brilliantly original" (Richmond Times-Dispatch) and "masterful" (Los Angeles Times) new series combines genuine suspense and intrigue with humor and insight for a tail-wagging good time readers won’t soon forget. From Publishers Weekly Taking the genre for another refreshing spin, Quinn brings back Chet, the 100-pound crime-fighting canine he introduced in last year's Dog On It. Once again narrated by Chet, this volume finds dog and owner, private investigator Bernie Little, down on their financial luck and looking into threats against a pampered celebrity show dog named Princess. Before long, Princess and her wealthy, high-maintenance owner are abducted, along with the newspaper reporter who was covering the case, Bernie's on-again off-again love interest, Susie Sanchez. The trail leads the four-legged detective and his bipedal partner to a creepy ghost town, where they're separated; with a bit of doggie diligence and good luck, the duo reunites and unravels a messy conspiracy involving a corrupt small-town sheriff, a disgruntled dog trainer, and two hippies who can't stop listening to "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida." Chet makes a clever narrator, thinking like a human but often confounded by figures of speech ("crocodile tears," "red herring"), and Quinn manages to keep things both humorous and suspenseful while delivering a proper, satisfying whodunit. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. From Booklist Quinn brings back the PI duo of Chet and Bernie (Dog on It, 2009) for their second adventure. Their latest job seems too good to be true: provide bodyguard service for a prize-winning show dog and get paid $2,000 a day, that is until the mistress and dog are kidnapped a few hours after arriving in town. Missing persons are Bernie and his dog Chet’s specialty, and they investigate with vigor. As in Dog on It, Chet narrates the entire book, and his doggy point of view is refreshing and consistent. Despite not always being able to focus on long conversations and getting distracted by snacks and smells, Chet is clearly the better investigator of the two, and his narration pulls the reader along as if on a leash. This fast-moving and fun series entry will certainly please Chet and Bernie fans as well as gain new readers with its all-ages appeal. Expect this series to become the hot new thing in animal mysteries. --Jessica Moyer

20139

Meeting an anonymous client late on a sizzling  summer night is asking for trouble. But trouble is  Chicago private eye V.I. Warshwski's specialty.  Her client says he's the prominent banker, John  Thayer. Turns out he's not. He says his son's  girlfriend, Anita Hill, is missing. Turns out that's  not her real name. V.I.'s search turns up someone  soon enough -- the real John Thayer's son, and  he's dead. Who's V.I.'s client? Why has she been  set up and sent out on a wild-goose chase? By the  time she's got it figured, things are hotter --  and deadlier -- than Chicago in July. V.I.'s in a  desperate race against time. At stake: a young  woman's life. Review "The Chicago writer  whose name always makes the top of the list when  people talk about the new female operatives."  -- Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times  Book Review. Review 'How enjoyable to settle down with a new book by Sara Paretsky.' -- Sunday Telegraph 'With the creation of V.I. Warshawski, Sara Paretsky did more than anyone to change the face of contemporary women's fiction.' -- Express on Sunday 'Warshawski's darkest outing, with no sign that her creator is flagging. Paretsky has written a novel in which a great deal is stripped bare, including Warshawski's innermost anxieties about herself, producing a narrative as gripping as it is emotionally wrenching.' -- JOAN SMITH, Sunday Times